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So, Your Boss Wants to Use Facebook…

Well, here’s a little Facebook 101 to get them started.

Long gone are the days when Facebook was solely for personal use to keep in touch with classmates, friends and family. Now, many nonprofits, brands, and small businesses are using Facebook’s platform to reach their audience. Here at the Workshop, Facebook is a tool we use constantly in our online communications plan to reach our audience, nonprofit communicators. Community Media Workshop has a Facebook fan page for the organization, which allows our co-founder and staff to keep their Facebook profiles separate and for private use. Many founders and executive directors at nonprofits may want to use their Facebook profile on behalf of the organization, however, this is not recommended. Instead, create a Facebook fan page for the organization.

Our resident social media experts are often asked, “what is the difference between a Facebook profile and a page?” Even though it can seem complicated, especially to someone who is new to Facebook, the answer can be put simply: a profile belongs to a person, and a page belongs to an organization or entity, like a nonprofit (and even a cause or a brand).

You can only have one Facebook profile – ’cause there’s only one you 😉

A Facebook profile is your personal “home” on the site where you connect with “friends” and post personal information about yourself including photos and status updates. “Friends” are the profiles of people you allow to view and interact with your profile, and in turn they allow you to view and interact with their profile. Friends will then see updates from your profile in their news feed and you will see their updates in your own news feed. On your profile you can only add 5000 friends. However, you can “follow” a person, which allows you to view any posts that they make public.

A Facebook page is essentially a fan page. You can make pages for your nonprofit, products and services, causes, your favorite band or TV show, and so on. When you create a fan page, fans must click “Like” in order to view updates and interact with the fan page. This is a great way for nonprofits to promote their cause, events, and connect with donors and volunteers.

Profiles and fan pages can tie into one another. At the Workshop, each staff member has a Facebook profile, which we use to log into Facebook and manage the organization’s page as an administrator. This means even though we are logging in with our personal profile information we are choosing to use Facebook as an administrator for Community Media Workshop’s fan page.  Did I confuse you? Sorry, there will be a part two, stay tuned.  In the meantime, sign up for our Social Media 101 training coming up on September 28th. And, enjoy this video that elaborates more on Facebook profiles vs. pages.

 

Post by DeAnndra Bunch

Storytelling with Storify

Guest post by Community Media Workshop board member Teresa Puente

Looking for an innovative way to tell a story?

Try Storify.

Storify uses social media to curate and create stories.

You pull publicly available information from Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram and You Tube. You also can paste a link from anything you find in the web and post it on Storify.

You can pick a topic that is in the news, such as a recent protest, sporting event or anything sources have posted content about on the social media networks.

Or you can create a Storify on an issue that your nonprofit is following. Say you have an event or press conference. You can take photos, videos, tweets or stories from that event and create a Storify of the event itself, of news media coverage of the event or a combination of the two.

Here is how you start:

Login with your Twitter account.

Write a headline for your Storify.

In the box below you can write a lede or a summary.

You build a Storify by using key words or hashtags (#) to search topics on the right.

Drag the content you want to use into the left space. This is where you build your Storify.

Also note that you can write mini text blocks in between each item you curate. You can use this for captions or add additional information about the social media content.

You may want a total of eight to 10 items in your Storify. Make sure there is a balance of tweets, Facebook posts, photos, video an text.

Then you publish your piece. You can share it with others on Twitter. People also can follow you on Storify.

Many news organizations and bloggers are using Storify as a storytelling tool. Once your Storify is published you can share the link or embed it on a blog or website.

It’s a great way to aggregate and curate content as well as share your original content that you have posted on the various social media networks.

See my video tutorial here:

 

Teresa Puente, author of “Chicanísima” blog on the ChicagoNow network is founder of “Latina Voices.com.” A veteran journalist, she is also an Associate Professor of Journalism at Columbia College Chicago and a long-standing board member of Community Media Workshop. Follow her tweets @tcpuente

Things to follow: cupcakes, new Facebook tools, blogs and… Gotye videos(?)

 

Everyone loves cupcakes… Here at the Workshop, we love cupcakes AND social media. So it shouldn’t surprise you that we follow both Flirty Cupcakes and the Food Truck Freak to find out where we can hunt down not only our favorite fluffy and sweet mid-day treats, but some other really great mobile food too! Yesterday, July 12 was declared Food Truck Day by the University of Chicago’s IJ Clinic on Entrepreneurship. The first 19 people in line at each food truck stop received free treats! How cool is that? The declaration was initiated to help build awareness around the upcoming July 19th city hearing on Food Trucks. A new ordinance would propose limiting available spaces food trucks could park and vend in the city.

When I asked our Operation Manager, Maggie Walker about how she started following Flirty Cupcakes she said, “I saw a link posted by someone I follow on Twitter and that’s how I found out about them. I don’t use Twitter that much so I began following them on Facebook instead.”

So now, the rest of the staff is well-informed about when the cupcake truck will be in front of our office. But what I find interesting is how most of us are using Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other social tools to share information and keep each other informed. For nonprofit communicators, how do we wield this power to communicate our messages and keep our audiences informed about our causes? We can learn a lot from each other. Perhaps that is why the whole #ff (Follow Friday) on Twitter has become so popular and is now an embedded cultural practice on the social web.

Here’s what we are following lately… Read the rest of this entry »

Who likes my Facebook page?

 

I recently held a seminar on Social Media Strategies and Planning for grantees of the Chicago Community Trust at the Garfield Park Conservatory. We covered everything from social culture on the web, to understanding social technographics (how users are categorized based on the their use of social media tools and how they relate to one another), to understanding the importance of developing a social media policy and plan.

We stressed that your strategy should be social in nature–it’s all about developing meaningful relationships with people by engaging directly through conversations.

After every workshop and seminar, we often get a lot of our participants asking us questions related to what they learned in our sessions. I just got a pretty good question from Marjorie Goran, the Development Manager at Onward Neighborhood House.

She asked,“Can you tell me how to access the names of people who “Like” our Facebook Page? My coworkers and I want to find out who these people are so we can start to engage them in conversations.” Read the rest of this entry »

Lessons learned from Social Media Bootcamp

Guest post by Marissa Wasseluk, New Media Associate

I’ve found that most organizations know they need to have a social media presence, but are unsure how to utilize social media tools to get their message across. What most don’t understand is that there is a philosophy behind social media communications and strategy behind its utilization.

The Workshop heard the outcry for a comprehensive look at this emerging, ever-changing communications platform (it sounded kind of like a kitten stuck up in a distant tree). We responded by creating a three-part course that delves into the world of social media to help break down and understand the medium and how to use it effectively.

hang in der, kitteh.

Thus, Social Media Bootcamp was born.  Adapted from social media trainings the Workshop has done in the past, we covered the following:

Day 1 – Introduction to Social Media Policy & Plan
Participants were asked to put into question their communications goals, and why social media will help them acheive those goals. Ask yourself, “Who am I talking to? How will I address this audience?” Explore, “What is a social media policy? How is it different from a plan and why do I need both?”

This was the week we played the social media game. I love the social media game because everyone wins.

Day 2 – Utilizing Tools & Tactics
This week we made the link between legend media and new media. You may not see it at first, but there is one. Best practices for the social engagement on Twitter, Facebook, & blogs were covered.

Tip of the week: keywords are just that – WORDS THAT ARE KEY TO YOUR MESSAGES. Analyze your goals and listen to your audience to find your keywords and draw upon them to start and join conversations on social media platforms!

Day 3 – Measuring Impact
Participants were introduced to tools like Hootsuite and Sprout Social and how to use them to understand their audience. Finding influencers and engaging them, as well as workflow were covered.

We also learned a little bit about SEO using the power of music.

I find that because the nature of social media is that it is ever-changing, the more I explore on the topic, the more I want to know.

Find out what can you learn from Social Media Bootcamp by listening in on and/or join the conversation on Twitter and following the hashtag #smb2012 . For more communications tips and tricks, you can also “like” the Workshop on Facebook or sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter!

If you just asked yourself what a hashtag is or how one uses it, I highly encourage you to join us for the Making Media Connections conference or contact us about a custom training!

Happy communicating!

A few days left to register: Social Media for Nonprofits-Chicago

Social Media for Nonprofits- Chicago 9/27

Is your nonprofit interested in using social media for fundraising, marketing, and advocacy?  Hear practical tips and tools from top experts at Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Groupon, Zynga, See3, Community Media Workshop, National Geographic, and more, all while enjoying some great networking with your nptech peers.  See full details here. The Community Media Workshop is pleased to be partnering with Social Media for Nonprofits to make this event happen!

After four sold out programs in a row, Social Media for Nonprofits is coming to Chicago next Tuesday, 9/27 at Columbia College.  Registration is normally $125 for the 9am-5pm program, plus meals and access to the book release party for Nonprofit Management 101, but you can save $20 with the discount code “Chi”.

Register on the Social Media for Nonprofits website, or learn more at their Twitter or Facebook pages.

Social Media for Nonprofits hits Chicago 9/27— Special Community Media Workshop discount (Guest post by Darian Rodriguez Heyman)

Building on the success of four sold-out conferences in San Francisco, New York City, Washington DC, and Los Angeles, we’re partnering with Community Media Workshop to bring Social Media for Nonprofits to Chicago’s Colombia College on Tuesday, September 27th.

  • The Community Media Workshop Hook Up: Friends of CMW save $20 off registration with the discount code “CMW.”
  • Our Focus: Produced in partnership with Community Media Workshop, the Chicago program features top brass from Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, as well as a variety of social media specialists.  Instead of heady concepts and theory, we’ve asked them all to share practical tips and tools for fundraising, marketing, and advocacy. Our format is “Twitter meets TED”— short, insight-packed sessions with plenty of time for networking.
  • Such a Bargain: $125 (minus your $20 discount) covers your registration for the 9am-5pm program, meals, and the networking reception and book release party for Nonprofit Management 101.
  • Star-Studded Cast: Our keynotes are Twitter’s nonprofit point person (and author of the upcoming “Twitter for Good”), Claire Diaz Ortiz and National Geographic’s Robert Michael Murray. Other speakers include the head of nonprofit relations for Facebook, Charles Porch, and LinkedIn, Bryan Breckenridge, plus Community Media Workshop’s very own Demetrio Maguigad, “Outsmarting Google” author Evan Bailyn, See3’s Nasser Asif, and Sprout Social’s Justyn Howard.
  • K.I.T., Mean It: Follow us on Twitter or Facebook to stay tuned for updates and details.

Looking forward to seeing you there and our door is always open, so please contact us with any questions or suggestions.

Toward Solutions,

Darian Rodriguez Heyman

Darian Rodriguez Heyman is the Co-Producer & MC of Social Media for Nonprofits, and the Editor of Nonprofit Management 101. He’s the former E.D. of Craigslist Foundation and the creator of their Nonprofit Boot Camp. Darian is currently a nonprofit and environmental consultant, focusing on fundraising, board development, and messaging, and he is a frequent public speaker and keynote at conferences around the world.

Facebook’s new marketing guide

Facebook released a “Best Practice Guide” earlier this week. If you’re managing an organization’s page on Facebook (or thinking about starting one), check it out. It offers step-by-step advice on issues including how to increase traffic, build loyalty and gain insights. Practically speaking, this guide book can help you, and me, gain more  ‘likes’ for our pages and engage in meaningful conversations with our fans.

The Facebook Best Practice Guide promotes five guiding principles for groups. I’ve added my two cents in parentheses.

1. Build a strategy that is social by design (Strategy? Some groups forget this key piece. So first, think about your strategy!)

2. Create an authentic brand voice (Talk amongst yourselves about this one before you start posting like a mad man.)

3. Make it interactive (If you’re like me, you’ll have to keep reminding yourself about this one. We get busy and sometimes we just want to post the link to our event! But, sometimes we need to ask people for feedback on the event.)

Additional note on this point: I was feeling guilty as I read Facebook’s guide and wrote this blog post because I know we can do more to interact with our awesome fans. We recently published a nifty vlog on why nonprofits need video. Instead of posting the video again, I went to our page and asked our fans to share THEIR nonprofit videos. Before I even finished this post, it worked! Two groups shared videos immediately.

4. Nurture your relationships (It’s not a one-way street. Just like talking to your mom shouldn’t be a one-way conversation.)

5. Keep learning (By reading their tool guide! And attending a Facebook training!)

Facebook is smart. They know more and more businesses and nonprofits are using Facebook to reach customers, build loyalty and generate awareness. This simple Best Practice Guide shares some tools with the world that will help organizations get the most out of Facebook.

At the Workshop, we just hit 600 fans. I’d love to see that number go a lot higher. The Guide gives me some things to think about, and I hope you will too. What are you doing to build fans on Facebook? Tell us what’s worked for you (or what hasn’t).

If you’d like in-person coaching to grow your organization’s Facebook page, sign up for our June pre-conference training “Essential Skills for Nonprofits on Facebook” with Emily Culbertson. She’s a social media whiz, and she’ll be sharing tips and tricks to build your Facebook presence.

We hope to see you at the annual Making Media Connections conference!

There’s Something About McHenry…

There’s something about McHenry County which keeps drawing me back to conduct training. Maybe its the sprawling landscape or the mom and pop shops that still keep their doors open, but most definitely its the people.

At my last training at the Shaw Center for Corporate Training, I was once again delighted to work with about 30 nonprofit staff working from Seniors Centers to Emergency Preparedness to issues of homelessness and affordable housing. Read the rest of this entry »

Chicago Tribune Editorial Board on Facebook

Chicago Tribune editorial board - pic

Chicago Tribune editorial board - pic

Facebook profile pic

Facebook profile pic

So social media communicator par excellence Nicole Gotthelf of Center for Neighborhood Technology tells me the Chicago Tribune editorial board has its own facebook page!

Now of course you already know the editorial board is the group of journalists who decide the paper’s official positions on matters of public policy (you remember what Mark Twain said: “Only presidents, editors and people with tapeworms have the right to use the editorial ‘we). Read the rest of this entry »

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  • Telling people’s stories, an ethnic media success September 2, 2015
        By Stephen Franklin Community Media Workshop   A 3-year-old child died on a plane from Chicago to Poland. This, Magdalena Pantelis instantly knew, was a story her readers would care about. But she needed more detail to write about it for the Polish Daily News, the nation’s oldest daily newspaper in Polish, founded Jan. […]