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Twitter: The 3 Bucket Rule

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Deontae Moore 

If you’ve participated in any of our social media trainings, you’ve probably come across this idea of the 3 buckets. While we try to consider this module for all social media platforms, it’s best practice comes from Twitter.

What does the 3 bucket rule mean?

The “3 Bucket Rule will spur you to a better understanding of what you need to do on social media if your organization needs to develop content.

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The “Me” Bucket

You’ve probably already mastered this one. It’s the self-promotion bucket. You create content that talks about your organization (or brand) and pretty much nothing else. This is fine because you should use social media to tell people who you are and what you are doing. But you do not want everything to be centered around you. However, you still need to tell your story and make sure you’re bringing awareness to your organization – that’s understandable. Consider posting a few times for things you’re doing all while eliminating any signs of the “screaming me-mes.”

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The “Me + Community” Bucket

You want to promote organizations doing what you’re doing or highlight any partner organizations you work with. Doing this builds you as an asset and also gives you content. This bucket also suggest that you share news related to what you do. This is purposely done to make you appear credible and to position your organization as a reliable resource.

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The “Me + People” Bucket

Who are your people? People make up an organization. So, this bucket is essentially to give your organization a human face. You want the personalities of your people to shine through to your organization’s account. It makes your content relatable, authentic and offers a human element to your Twitter account. Retweet some of the things your president or marketing director is saying on their Twitter account – make your audience get a sense of who you are. Content that tends to do best on social media is behind the scenes material – so capitalize on this notion.

We credit the bucket rule to Ms. Amy Guth, a phenomenal communicator. Follow her on Twitter (@amyguth)

Deontae Moore is the Marketing & Digital Media Manager at Community Media Workshop. You can follow him on Twitter here

Storytelling with Storify

Guest post by Community Media Workshop board member Teresa Puente

Looking for an innovative way to tell a story?

Try Storify.

Storify uses social media to curate and create stories.

You pull publicly available information from Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram and You Tube. You also can paste a link from anything you find in the web and post it on Storify.

You can pick a topic that is in the news, such as a recent protest, sporting event or anything sources have posted content about on the social media networks.

Or you can create a Storify on an issue that your nonprofit is following. Say you have an event or press conference. You can take photos, videos, tweets or stories from that event and create a Storify of the event itself, of news media coverage of the event or a combination of the two.

Here is how you start:

Login with your Twitter account.

Write a headline for your Storify.

In the box below you can write a lede or a summary.

You build a Storify by using key words or hashtags (#) to search topics on the right.

Drag the content you want to use into the left space. This is where you build your Storify.

Also note that you can write mini text blocks in between each item you curate. You can use this for captions or add additional information about the social media content.

You may want a total of eight to 10 items in your Storify. Make sure there is a balance of tweets, Facebook posts, photos, video an text.

Then you publish your piece. You can share it with others on Twitter. People also can follow you on Storify.

Many news organizations and bloggers are using Storify as a storytelling tool. Once your Storify is published you can share the link or embed it on a blog or website.

It’s a great way to aggregate and curate content as well as share your original content that you have posted on the various social media networks.

See my video tutorial here:

 

Teresa Puente, author of “Chicanísima” blog on the ChicagoNow network is founder of “Latina Voices.com.” A veteran journalist, she is also an Associate Professor of Journalism at Columbia College Chicago and a long-standing board member of Community Media Workshop. Follow her tweets @tcpuente

If a picture is worth a thousand words, what is a 6-second video clip worth?

 

Guest post by DeAnndra B.

 

Vine

This is not an endorsement for Vine nor is it a step-by-step guide of how to use Vine. *cue dramatic instrumental movie music* This is about my journey three weeks using the Vine app with iPhone. Let’s begin.

 Twitter’s Vine is a mobile-only app that allows users to create 6-second looped videos that are posted within the app. This concept seemed so cool to me, but I was weary of how the app would be used for good, and the not-so good that often exists in the social media world. Vine was introduced to the Apple App Store for iOS devices in late January of this year. Sites like Mashable and TechCrunch had helped announce the app’s arrival and it seemed as if everyone was buzzing about Vine. To add to the online buzz, the app’s own Blog posted Vines created by the Brooklyn Nets, RedVines, Paul McCartney and other celebrities and brands.

As a communicator attempting to stay on top of the latest trends in social media, I downloaded Vine immediately. And for a few weeks that was all I did with the app even though it was clearly gaining popularity amongst my peers. We discussed Vine briefly at The Workshop, since we’re all iPhone users, and no one really had an opinion about it other than “it seems cool”. I decided I would try to learn more about Vine, find out how cool it really is, and maybe even become a successful regular user. I figured that I could work Vine into The Workshop’s social media plan, and potentially a mobile communications plan.

I will admit that I struggled with exactly what and how to vine and when was an appropriate to vine. Using Vine was a little more challenging than I had expected. This little six-second video was taking more time to plan and shoot than it would actually run in the app. For about two weeks I shot videos of trainings, videos featuring our media guide, and doodles scribbles notes from marketing meetings. Most of them were posted to my Vine and  Twitter accounts. Many did not make the cut for one reason or another, including my phone dying in the middle of posting. Really, I was challenged because I was over thinking the process and what the finished product should be. There is no editing with Vine; it’s simple and what you shoot, is what you get.

Once I stopped over thinking how to make the perfect Vine, it became more natural, fun, and I wanted to Vine everything. While I still consider myself a Vine amateur, I can say that The Workshop has incorporated Vine into our own social media plan. Here’s why: content is king and mobile is taking over. 

    • Vine allows non-profits and brands to connect with their audience on their iOS mobile device. There are not many social media apps that are mobile-based and/ or mobile-only apps. If you’re looking for a new way to connect with your audience and share content on-the-go quickly, consider Vine. Share quick content from a forum, a rally, or even something in your office like a cat at The Humane Society.  Use Vine to tell a story, share your organization’s messages, or create a call to action.
    • Non-profits and brands can create unique visual content with the app and easily share it with their Twitter and Facebook followers. Now you have instantly updated your Facebook at least once for the day and you have an automatic Tweet to share. In addition, you can create a short paragraph discussing your daily Vine, and now you have a blog post. Which brings me to my next point…
    • You can embed Vines for use on the web!  Add a Vine to your blog or e-newsletter by embedding it like I did below with one of The Workshop’s Vines. I’m sure this is an option for any webpage on your website as well.

[By the way, feel free to take our social media survey.]

 

Vine is also easy to use as far as design and functionality are concerned. In my opinion, Vine has some functional similarities to Instagram. You can create a profile, including an avatar, link to your Twitter account, follow other profiles, “like” Vines by tapping the smiley face underneath the post and comment. Additionally, you have the option to mute or un-mute the audio on any Vine.

Here’s a little more of what I learned while using the app:

  • A viral Vine post may take a little planning and a bit of a director’s eye, but no experience is necessary.
  • Vine automatically saves the video to the camera roll on the device. So, if your phone dies in the middle of a Vine, all is not lost.
  • I haven’t discovered a way to link to your profile other than users finding you through the app via name, Twitter account, or email.
  • Use the explore tab to search for people, trending hashtags, or popular Vines including Editor’s Picks, Popular Now, and Trending.
  • By nature of the app, creativity is gold. Be as creative with your 6-seconds as you want incorporating text and different sounds.

Lastly, have you seen this Vine resume by Dawn Siff?  And, she actually landed a job!

What do you think of the Vine app? Have you created any Vines already? If so, please share them with The Workshop and follow us on Vine (at) The Workshop.

 

 

 

 

Five steps to understanding Twitter and six tips for social media work

A screen shot of part of the Workshop's Hootsuite dashboard. Hootsuite is a great tool to use to manage social media in your office.

After conducting some communications trainings in Minnesota and Indiana for LISC’s Institute for Comprehensive Community Development, I was interviewed by one of their writers about social media. One article addresses a question I hear all the time from people we work with, “Why Tweet?” I offer my thoughts on why it’s useful and how to get started.

The second article is six basic tips for using social media in your work. There’s also a list of useful social media resources at the bottom that you may want to check out.

If you’re still looking for more advice on getting started or improving your social media strategy, attend one of our upcoming trainings. I’ll be leading a Social Media Basics webinar on Nov. 1, and the Workshop is offering an intermediate social media training on Nov. 10 with popular trainer Adam Thurman of Mission Paradox.

If you’d like a custom social media training for your organization, just email me at nora@newstips.org

Happy tweeting!

A few days left to register: Social Media for Nonprofits-Chicago

Social Media for Nonprofits- Chicago 9/27

Is your nonprofit interested in using social media for fundraising, marketing, and advocacy?  Hear practical tips and tools from top experts at Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Groupon, Zynga, See3, Community Media Workshop, National Geographic, and more, all while enjoying some great networking with your nptech peers.  See full details here. The Community Media Workshop is pleased to be partnering with Social Media for Nonprofits to make this event happen!

After four sold out programs in a row, Social Media for Nonprofits is coming to Chicago next Tuesday, 9/27 at Columbia College.  Registration is normally $125 for the 9am-5pm program, plus meals and access to the book release party for Nonprofit Management 101, but you can save $20 with the discount code “Chi”.

Register on the Social Media for Nonprofits website, or learn more at their Twitter or Facebook pages.

Social Media for Nonprofits hits Chicago 9/27— Special Community Media Workshop discount (Guest post by Darian Rodriguez Heyman)

Building on the success of four sold-out conferences in San Francisco, New York City, Washington DC, and Los Angeles, we’re partnering with Community Media Workshop to bring Social Media for Nonprofits to Chicago’s Colombia College on Tuesday, September 27th.

  • The Community Media Workshop Hook Up: Friends of CMW save $20 off registration with the discount code “CMW.”
  • Our Focus: Produced in partnership with Community Media Workshop, the Chicago program features top brass from Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, as well as a variety of social media specialists.  Instead of heady concepts and theory, we’ve asked them all to share practical tips and tools for fundraising, marketing, and advocacy. Our format is “Twitter meets TED”— short, insight-packed sessions with plenty of time for networking.
  • Such a Bargain: $125 (minus your $20 discount) covers your registration for the 9am-5pm program, meals, and the networking reception and book release party for Nonprofit Management 101.
  • Star-Studded Cast: Our keynotes are Twitter’s nonprofit point person (and author of the upcoming “Twitter for Good”), Claire Diaz Ortiz and National Geographic’s Robert Michael Murray. Other speakers include the head of nonprofit relations for Facebook, Charles Porch, and LinkedIn, Bryan Breckenridge, plus Community Media Workshop’s very own Demetrio Maguigad, “Outsmarting Google” author Evan Bailyn, See3’s Nasser Asif, and Sprout Social’s Justyn Howard.
  • K.I.T., Mean It: Follow us on Twitter or Facebook to stay tuned for updates and details.

Looking forward to seeing you there and our door is always open, so please contact us with any questions or suggestions.

Toward Solutions,

Darian Rodriguez Heyman

Darian Rodriguez Heyman is the Co-Producer & MC of Social Media for Nonprofits, and the Editor of Nonprofit Management 101. He’s the former E.D. of Craigslist Foundation and the creator of their Nonprofit Boot Camp. Darian is currently a nonprofit and environmental consultant, focusing on fundraising, board development, and messaging, and he is a frequent public speaker and keynote at conferences around the world.

Want to pitch the Chicago News Cooperative?

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You can find their contact information and more in the 2011 “Getting on Air, Online & Into Print” media guide. The Chicago News Coop (a community-focused nonprofit news site whose current claim to fame is providing The New York Times with Chicago-focused stories for the weekend paper) is just one of hundreds of outlets in the new guide. In addition to updated information for all the major outlets such as the Chicago Tribune and Chicago Public Radio, it also has contact information for Patch.com editors in the suburbs, reporters’ Twitter accounts, an expanded online news section, and lists of journalists by issue area.

They’re hot off the presses and in our office. Order yours today.

There’s Something About McHenry…

There’s something about McHenry County which keeps drawing me back to conduct training. Maybe its the sprawling landscape or the mom and pop shops that still keep their doors open, but most definitely its the people.

At my last training at the Shaw Center for Corporate Training, I was once again delighted to work with about 30 nonprofit staff working from Seniors Centers to Emergency Preparedness to issues of homelessness and affordable housing. Read the rest of this entry »

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