Follow @npcommunicator on Twitter.com | NPCommunicator HOME | About

So, Your Boss Wants to Use Facebook…

Well, here’s a little Facebook 101 to get them started.

Long gone are the days when Facebook was solely for personal use to keep in touch with classmates, friends and family. Now, many nonprofits, brands, and small businesses are using Facebook’s platform to reach their audience. Here at the Workshop, Facebook is a tool we use constantly in our online communications plan to reach our audience, nonprofit communicators. Community Media Workshop has a Facebook fan page for the organization, which allows our co-founder and staff to keep their Facebook profiles separate and for private use. Many founders and executive directors at nonprofits may want to use their Facebook profile on behalf of the organization, however, this is not recommended. Instead, create a Facebook fan page for the organization.

Our resident social media experts are often asked, “what is the difference between a Facebook profile and a page?” Even though it can seem complicated, especially to someone who is new to Facebook, the answer can be put simply: a profile belongs to a person, and a page belongs to an organization or entity, like a nonprofit (and even a cause or a brand).

You can only have one Facebook profile – ’cause there’s only one you ;-)

A Facebook profile is your personal “home” on the site where you connect with “friends” and post personal information about yourself including photos and status updates. “Friends” are the profiles of people you allow to view and interact with your profile, and in turn they allow you to view and interact with their profile. Friends will then see updates from your profile in their news feed and you will see their updates in your own news feed. On your profile you can only add 5000 friends. However, you can “follow” a person, which allows you to view any posts that they make public.

A Facebook page is essentially a fan page. You can make pages for your nonprofit, products and services, causes, your favorite band or TV show, and so on. When you create a fan page, fans must click “Like” in order to view updates and interact with the fan page. This is a great way for nonprofits to promote their cause, events, and connect with donors and volunteers.

Profiles and fan pages can tie into one another. At the Workshop, each staff member has a Facebook profile, which we use to log into Facebook and manage the organization’s page as an administrator. This means even though we are logging in with our personal profile information we are choosing to use Facebook as an administrator for Community Media Workshop’s fan page.  Did I confuse you? Sorry, there will be a part two, stay tuned.  In the meantime, sign up for our Social Media 101 training coming up on September 28th. And, enjoy this video that elaborates more on Facebook profiles vs. pages.

 

Post by DeAnndra Bunch

Print this Post Print this Post

Category: social media, Tips, Trainings

Tagged: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Get Nonprofit Communicator in Your Inbox!

Enter your email address:


Subscribe in a reader

Archives

Add to Technorati Favorites

Alltop, all the top stories

Categories


*

*

*



*