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Storytelling with Storify

Guest post by Community Media Workshop board member Teresa Puente

Looking for an innovative way to tell a story?

Try Storify.

Storify uses social media to curate and create stories.

You pull publicly available information from Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram and You Tube. You also can paste a link from anything you find in the web and post it on Storify.

You can pick a topic that is in the news, such as a recent protest, sporting event or anything sources have posted content about on the social media networks.

Or you can create a Storify on an issue that your nonprofit is following. Say you have an event or press conference. You can take photos, videos, tweets or stories from that event and create a Storify of the event itself, of news media coverage of the event or a combination of the two.

Here is how you start:

Login with your Twitter account.

Write a headline for your Storify.

In the box below you can write a lede or a summary.

You build a Storify by using key words or hashtags (#) to search topics on the right.

Drag the content you want to use into the left space. This is where you build your Storify.

Also note that you can write mini text blocks in between each item you curate. You can use this for captions or add additional information about the social media content.

You may want a total of eight to 10 items in your Storify. Make sure there is a balance of tweets, Facebook posts, photos, video an text.

Then you publish your piece. You can share it with others on Twitter. People also can follow you on Storify.

Many news organizations and bloggers are using Storify as a storytelling tool. Once your Storify is published you can share the link or embed it on a blog or website.

It’s a great way to aggregate and curate content as well as share your original content that you have posted on the various social media networks.

See my video tutorial here:

 

Teresa Puente, author of “Chicanísima” blog on the ChicagoNow network is founder of “Latina Voices.com.” A veteran journalist, she is also an Associate Professor of Journalism at Columbia College Chicago and a long-standing board member of Community Media Workshop. Follow her tweets @tcpuente

Internship Tales: My Summer as a New Media Intern at the Community Media Workshop

Guest post by Community Media Workshop new media intern Lucia Anaya

When I began working at Community Media Workshop this summer as a new media intern I was looking to improve my web and social media skills. I had prior experience posting to content management systems (CMS), as well as posting on several types of social media platforms; however, I was unfamiliar with the strategizing and planning it took to successfully engage our followers and measure that engagement; something I hoped to learn through my time at the Workshop.

Lucia Anaya, new arts journalism graduate student at School of the Art Institute of Chicago, earned course credit as an intern at the Workshop through her school’s internship program.

Throughout the summer, I worked alongside New Media Manager Adriana Diaz and fellow new media intern Jennifer Wolan to not only increase followers and likes to the Workshop’s multiple social media platforms, but also engage and keep those new followers interested. We wrote original blog posts, asked readers questions and shared content pertaining to the subjects of that social media platform (i.e. individuals standing up to the violence in their community for the We Are Not Alone Facebook page and city news for the Newstips Twitter). We planned these posts ahead of time, and tracked our progress using social media management software like Sprout Social.

While my title indicated I was an intern, I certainly never felt like one—there were no coffee errands to run, no busy work. I was given the opportunity to not only sit-in but participate in staff meetings, and given responsibilities that were geared to develop my web and social media skills. And though my initial goal was to familiarize myself with strategizing and planning, I came away with much more insight than I ever expected.

It’s been a great three months and while I’m sad my time is over at the Workshop, I’m confident that I’m walking away with essential skills and insight that will help place me in the career I want in the future. The guidance that I received from Adriana, and other Workshop staff members have helped me tremendously and I will forever be grateful for the opportunity to work alongside them.

Interested in an internship at the Workshop? Check out opportunities here.

Lucia is a journalist and graduate student at the School for the Art Institute of Chicago. Follow her on Twitter @luciaanaya_ 

Evolution: 23 Years of ADA, Changing Attitudes about Disability

Guest post by Community Media Workshop board member Gary Arnold

This summer marks the 23rd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The anniversary reminds me of a story a colleague of mine told me years ago.  The story goes: he sat in a room with reporters, then bluntly said, “The best thing you could do for us would be to never write another word about disability.”

Though not helpful for my job as public relations coordinator, his story resonated.

At the time, story lines around disability included Jerry Lewis exclaiming that if he were a person with a disability he’d only be “half a person;” and raising “pity” money for kids with muscular dystrophy; Princeton ethicist Peter Singer advocating to kill disabled babies; and Clint Eastwood directing a movie about a boxer who ends her life after becoming disabled.

The dominant message emerging from these story lines was that disability is a tragedy best dealt with by finding a cure or ending life.

These story lines conflict with reality.  Research may have its place, but resources going toward a cure are better directed toward accessible transportation, accessible schools, accessible housing, and job placement.  Million Dollar Baby may have won some awards, but the inspiration for the movie comes from a boxer named Katie Dallum who, continues to live and be productive. A painting of hers hangs in the second floor hallway of Access Living.

In reality, people with disability are average.  They are not interested in cures.  They are not wallowing about and wondering how to overcome disability. They are ordinary people who try to do ordinary things like go to school and go to work.  Unfortunately, sometimes they are not able to because they are forced to engage in communities that are not physically accommodating and engage with attitudes that are still stunted by stigma associated with disability myths.

At Access Living, our goal is to give people with disabilities the tools they need to navigate stigma and inaccessibility in order to participate in general society.

To support that goal, as the public relations coordinator for Access Living, my job is to sell the ordinary.

The better I am at pitching stories that show people with disabilities are just like everybody else, the more the general public makes connections between people with disabilities and the regular fabric of society.

The job can be challenging. Ordinary doesn’t compete with cures, infanticide and assisted suicide when it comes to headlines.   But challenges are what define the job of a non-profit communicator.  I love the process of connecting with reporters, sharing information, then building professional relationships.  More times than not, those connections don’t lead to media hits, but every once in a while they do.  Even if the connections don’t lead to stories, when we build relationships, we position ourselves as sources.  As a source, media relay our messages, even if the stories are not directly related to our organizations.

Twenty-three years after the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed, more work needs to be done in terms of equality for people with disabilities.  The unemployment rate of people with disabilities is higher than any other marginalized community.  Thousands of people with disabilities are still segregated in institutions when they could be living at home with the right community supports.  These issues lead to a disconnect between the disability community and the general population.

As a result of this disconnect, media sometimes continue to describe disability as if it is a curse or disease.  But the gap between disability and non-disability is slowly closing, and there are plenty of stories to be told that will help change attitudes about disability, and that will continue to close the gap.  As a non-profit communicator, I am proud to be part of the effort to help bridge the gap.

Gary is the public relations coordinator for Access Living and a board member of Community Media Workshop. Follow him on Twitter @gary8970

People To Pitch: Lisa Bertagnoli, Freelance Writer

Guest post by Jennifer Wolan, Community Media Workshop New Media Intern

Lisa Bertagnoli is a Chicago-area freelancer and frequently contributes to Crain’s Chicago Business. Her stories include ‘Sometimes an organization needs a wakeup call’ and ‘Chicago’s nonprofit struggling.’

With the extensive nonprofit and organization reporting Lisa does, we asked her tips on how to pitch her. Lisa’s answers are below.

How do you usually receive a pitch from organizations?

Email. Social Media is not an effective way to get in touch with me.

Do you have any pet peeves about press releases?

I don’t really have any pet peeves about press releases but what I am looking for is personalization. I like to be personalized. I like for people to know my column and what I write about and pitch stories to me personally. Example would be, ‘You wrote a story a month ago about XYZ and this is why I think you’d be interested ABC.’ I know that sounds very selfish but I get so many press releases and so many pitches and if someone indicates that they know what I write about. I don’t think I’d write about someone who got a grant from an organization and was able to go on and do great things– those touchy-feely stories. I know it sounds very cold and impersonal but that’s not what I write about and it’s not my beat. I write about the financial and the nonprofits and what makes them tic. So if someone understands that and conveys that in a press release, I would be more likely to read it and respond to that person.

As a freelancer I have to be really invested and excited about a story I think to pitch it well (to her editor). I just can’t say it enough, please take a few days to read my stories, understand what I do and who I do it for. And that would help immensely. Just like I need to know the publications I pitch for. I need to know who they’re writing for and who their market is. It’s a big “pitch chain”, the way I put it.

Can you give an example of what is a good personal press release?

Just an understanding of what I do, that’s what I mean by personal. If someone has googled me, read my columns in Crain’s, they understand my approach to what I do. I write for a very sophisticated audience. A lot of times I get press releases, for example, “beer and shots night at Pat’s bar and grill.” And I don’t do that.

Have you ever been pitched in person through organizations?

Sure! We get talking and an idea come up. But I don’t get ideas from pitches per say, I get ideas from talking to the person. For example, someone came up to be last week and told me a fundraiser was coming up and that turned into a story. I get a lot of story ideas that turn into stories from talking to people at events. With that in mind, if someone comes up to me at an event and says, ‘Hey, I have a great story for you.’ 9 times out of 9 I will say, ‘it sounds good, write me an email.’ So I can see it in person, digest it and think of a way I might pitch it to my editors. It functions as a network and were talking to a lot of people and it’s really hard to stand still to a 5 minute pitch and digest it. I will always as for a follow up in an email.

Do you get story ideas through social media events or organizations?

I get story sources through Twitter and Facebook, if I have a story assigned that I’m working on I will look at Facebook and Twitter to find sources from the story. A couple of times I’ve gotten story ideas based on what was trending on twitter but mostly I look at Twitter for sources. That might change in the future. I’m trying to get more active on Twitter. I tweet from events and things like that and I’m trying to do more with Twitter but not really Facebook, that’s for my personal life.

If you would like to pitch to Lisa Bertagnoli, her e-mail is lbertagnoli@comcast.net

People to Pitch: La Risa Lynch, Freelance Writer

Guest post by Lucia Anaya, Community Media Workshop New Media Intern

La Risa Lynch has been a Chicago freelance writer for more than 15 years, having written for several community newspapers including the Chicago Defender, Chicago Crusader and The Final Call. Her stories are often about criminal justice or social issues affecting the city of Chicago.

With Lynch’s extensive experience and skill, we asked for tips on the best way nonprofit organizations can maximize the value of their pitch to journalists and media outlets. Below is her advice.

What key advice would you give a non profit organization who is trying to attain media coverage of their issue or event?

The one thing I could advise anyone to do is to look at what the reporter is writing and tailor your pitch to that. If you send something to me about transportation, I probably won’t be interested. But if it’s something let’s say like, the CTA isn’t hiring any minority contractors, then that would be something I would be interested in. A lot of times the newspapers that I write for are issue oriented; they prefer some of those hard-hitting issues.

What should organizations not do when pitching you?

Don’t send an attachment with an email.  Sometimes the attachment won’t open or it might have a virus. Instead just embed whatever that is in the body of the email.

Another thing is to not be too aggressive when you’re trying to pitch. We have a lot on our plates and sometimes being a little bit more subtle would catch my attention instead of saying, “well you need to come out and cover this.” If instead you say, “this is what I have here and I think this is something you might be interested in, I would love for you to come by and cover it,” it would be easier.

How do you prefer to receive pitches?

Email. I’m so busy that sometimes I don’t have the time to call you back. If you send it to me by email it’s always there to remind me. If I save you in my voicemail box, I might forget about you, so email is best.

And what should the subject line read, what would grab your attention?

Words like “protest” or “meeting on housing” will let me know what the email is about. Don’t put the phrases “story assignment or “possible story.” When pitching a story say “we’re having a protest” or “we’re having a meeting on CHA.” That will work to grab my attention.

To what extent should an organization do research on the publication?

Definitely try and do some research on the paper itself. Pick up the paper and look through their website to see what kind of stories they are covering. That’s how you’ll know if the paper will fit in with what you are trying to do. It’s helpful especially because a lot of community newspapers are not like the Chicago Sun-Times or the Chicago Tribune who have a lot of staff to go out and cover stuff. Community newspapers are always looking for content but it has to be the right kind of content with what matches up to what they’re writing about.

If you would like to pitch La Risa Lynch, e-mail her at larisalynch@yahoo.com

In Defense of the Spanish Language: How to Give Meaning to Your Translations

Guest post by Community Media Workshop board member Queta Rodríguez Bauer

Ever since I came to this country more than 30 years ago, one of my pet peeves has been the poor quality of Spanish translations.

When I see posters, ads, brochures or signs, I cringe.

I even wonder whether the quality has deteriorated in recent years, or whether it may have become an obsession of mine to avidly read all translated materials that fall into my hands with the futile hope that this time I will find no errors. Most likely there is some of both, since the former feeds the latter.

As a result of the increase in the Latino population, there are two consequences that affect language. One is that there are more first-generation Latinos who learned Spanish from their parents. The second is that governments and organizations who want to reach Spanish-speaking immigrants are developing more materials in Spanish. But the efforts are often wasted due to the poor quality of the translations.

 

So why the poor quality? I have a theory.

My sense is that more often than not, translations of items like brochures, labels, taglines and signs are made by first-generation Latinos, employed by the organizations that need the translations. These employees are acculturated Americans, having grown up and gone to school here, and speak Spanish because their parents spoke Spanish to them when they were growing up. They are well-intentioned when they offer their services; they will save their organization some money and show their willingness to help; and the organization may also view this as a money-saving practice. And how hard can it be to make a short translation? (For long translations organizations usually use professional services.)

The problem is that often the people making the translations have grown up hearing or speaking the wrong vocabulary or the incorrect syntax without realizing it. Moreover, people may repeat the incorrect words so many times that after a while they stop sounding weird.

In some cases, first-generation Latinos come from immigrant homes where the parents had little formal education because they had to work as children. These parents spoke to their own children using a type of Spanish that reflected their lack of education. As a result the children picked up their parents’ Spanish, and their written Spanish lacks the correct grammar and syntax. Furthermore, because their vocabulary is limited, their translations tend to be too literal.

Many first-generation Latinos speak Spanish very well, and even write it well (including my daughters and my Latino employees). But even they make mistakes sometimes because they did not learn the language as they would have, had they gone to school and grown up in a Spanish-speaking country.

In order to have the best possible translations into Spanish, I recommend considering the following guidelines:

• To begin, if your English copy is confusing, unclear, or poorly written, you will have a poor, unclear translation in Spanish. (“Garbage in, garbage out.”) Make sure your English copy is clear and understandable.

• Always have a professional, or somebody who was educated in a Spanish speaking country, translate your materials, or at least review the translations your first generation Spanish speakers did for you.

• When you know you are going to need materials in both languages, develop the materials in English and Spanish at the same time, with the help of a bilingual person. Sometimes people think of taglines or descriptions that sound very well in English, but once translated don’t make very much sense. They then have to be explained in Spanish, taking much more space than normal, which is important for graphic designers.

• Keep in mind translations into Spanish normally expand about 30%. Your graphic designer will have to take that into account.

• Do not confuse correct grammar and syntax with style. As with English, things can be correctly described but awkwardly phrased.

• Do not use metaphors or sports terminology in English or be prepared to use a different metaphor in Spanish.

• If possible, run your translations by native Spanish speakers from several countries to make sure you are not using words that may be offensive, or at least strange, for other nationalities. For instance: “guaguá” in Mexico means doggy, and “guagua” (no accent) means “bus” in Caribbean countries and “baby” in Andean countries.

• It seems obvious, but many people, whether they are native speakers or not, forget that when in doubt they can use a dictionary. I also recommend WordReference.com to verify the meaning of words; the website even has very useful discussion forums and links to authoritative sources. But avoid overly literal translations!

While trying to reach Latinos in the U.S., one of the first rules is to show respect for your audience by showing respect for the language.

It can seem rather condescending to provide materials in Spanish that are plagued with mistakes. Good communication, whether in English or in another language, is all about meaning; and meaning has to be conveyed with clarity. If your English copy is clear, and your Spanish translation has the correct syntax and vocabulary, it doesn’t matter if the translation is not literal. You will be saying what you mean.

 

Queta Rodríguez Bauer, MSC, ABC, is Principal of Cultural Communications, LLC., a strategic communications firm in Chicago. She may be reached at 773-285-1055 or qbauer@culturalcommunications.com.

Modern Mobilizing: Activism in the Digital Age

Guest post by Thom Clark

The Internet brought more information to each of our desktops than we ever dreamed of 10, 15, 20 years ago. But in the last five years, the rise of social media and digital tools, like the tablet and smart phone, are transforming how many organizations get their work done, engage existing members and expand their base.

“While engaging your current community is critical to fulfilling your organizational mission,” according to Tracy VanSlyke, co-director of The New Bottom Line, “Broadening your community to advance your work is equally important.”

Effective use of digital tools for organizing one’s members, campaigns and program is critical in this 24/7 world of data dumps and info overload.

VanSlyke will moderate an afternoon panel June 4, 2013 at Making Media Connections on activism in the Digital Age, featuring activists who use digital tools in their work: Martin Macias, Jr. of Chicago Fair Trade; Eric Tellez of Grassroots Collaborative and Charlene Carruthers of National Peoples Action.

“Digital tools allow you to go beyond one-way organizing to engage and build relationships within your community,” she says. “If you want to be influencing the media, to expand and deepen impact of your work, you have to be serious about building community both online and off line.”

A veteran of many local and national campaigns, most recently around stemming the tide of home foreclosures and holding banks more accountable, VanSlyke will engage her panelists in a conversation about successful, and some not so successful efforts to use these tools to further organizational goals. “There is still so much to be discovered with these new tools,” she reports, “with many possible complications. It’s still more an art form than a science, that is constantly evolving with experimentation.”

——————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Modern Mobilizing: Activism in the Digital Age
2:15-3:30 June 4 Film Row Cinema, Columbia College 1104 S Wabash

Digi-wha? Digital organizing is modern campaigning and we’re here to help you improve your digital work in activism and organizing. Learn how digital tools, like social media, can help you not just say something, but be heard.  Panelists: Martin Macias, Jr. (Media activist/Youth Organizer at Chicago Fair Trade); Charlene Carruthers (National Peoples Action); Eric Téllez (Grassroots Collaborative); Moderator: Tracy Van Slyke (co-author of The Echo Chamber)

Lessons Learned as a Non-Profit Communicator

Guest post by Community Media Workshop board member Gary Arnold

Years ago, I moved into the communications role at Access Living, a non-profit service and advocacy organization for people with disabilities, with no prior communications experience.

Stories I’ve heard from my peers tell me I am not alone. Out of necessity, non-profits often assign communications jobs to employees who typically don’t have a communications background.

Like many of my peers, I turned to the Community Media Workshop for support, which helps bridge the gap between communications novices and the skill set necessary to pitch an organization’s story.

I still remember my first class at the Workshop.

To break the ice, Thom went around the room, asking each of us our media goal. Each of us gave roughly the same answer, “to promote and raise the visibility of our organization.”

Thom looked at us with a patient grin, then delivered my first lesson in public relations. He taught us that communications goals should not be as broad as an organization.

Communications is about delivering a specific message that resonates with broad audience. The best way to deliver that message is through a story with which everyone can relate.

While that first lesson proves timeless, public relations has evolved.

With mainstream media operating on fewer resources, the chances of the Chicago Tribune or Channel 11 publishing a story pitched by a non-profit communicator, no matter how specific and compelling the message, are slimmer today than they were a few years ago.

But while selling your story to a daily paper may be more difficult, non-profit communicators have plenty of tools to tell stories. With blogs, websites, social media, and expanded internet journalism, there are still plenty of outlets to pitch a story, and plenty of portals to self-publish a story.

Of course, a Chicago Sun-Times article that cites your organization will please your executive director and board chair more than a blog post on your organization’s website; but the value of publishing outside of mainstream media, then promoting and sharing content, should not be underestimated.

Just last week, I was reminded of social media’s value. I was following the Twitter stream of National ADAPT, a grassroots direct action group that employs civil disobedience to push disability rights. ADAPT was in Washington, DC for three days of protests against the White House; the US Department of Housing and Urban Development; and the Department of Labor for what ADAPT understood to be their failure to follow through on their commitments to the independence of people with disabilities.

ADAPT’s live tweets gave a play by play of the day’s action, but there were no visuals. I could re-tweet the messages, but if I wanted to post on Facebook, the picture-less messages would have little impact.

A few people tweeted directly to ADAPT, asking for pictures. Almost immediately, ADAPT sent pictures of hundreds of protesters marching and rolling in wheelchairs throughout the streets of Washington. The photos were posted on Facebook, generating a response many, many times greater than the impact made by a link to a press release posted earlier in the day.

It doesn’t take a communications professional to post on social media. But the experience last week underscores how media has changed in the past decade.

We may have lost some of the benefits of traditional media, but it’s hard to deny the excitement of instantaneous communication and innovative outreach offered by new media.

Follow Gary Arnold @gary8970

Social Media for Nonprofits hits Chicago 9/27— Special Community Media Workshop discount (Guest post by Darian Rodriguez Heyman)

Building on the success of four sold-out conferences in San Francisco, New York City, Washington DC, and Los Angeles, we’re partnering with Community Media Workshop to bring Social Media for Nonprofits to Chicago’s Colombia College on Tuesday, September 27th.

  • The Community Media Workshop Hook Up: Friends of CMW save $20 off registration with the discount code “CMW.”
  • Our Focus: Produced in partnership with Community Media Workshop, the Chicago program features top brass from Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, as well as a variety of social media specialists.  Instead of heady concepts and theory, we’ve asked them all to share practical tips and tools for fundraising, marketing, and advocacy. Our format is “Twitter meets TED”— short, insight-packed sessions with plenty of time for networking.
  • Such a Bargain: $125 (minus your $20 discount) covers your registration for the 9am-5pm program, meals, and the networking reception and book release party for Nonprofit Management 101.
  • Star-Studded Cast: Our keynotes are Twitter’s nonprofit point person (and author of the upcoming “Twitter for Good”), Claire Diaz Ortiz and National Geographic’s Robert Michael Murray. Other speakers include the head of nonprofit relations for Facebook, Charles Porch, and LinkedIn, Bryan Breckenridge, plus Community Media Workshop’s very own Demetrio Maguigad, “Outsmarting Google” author Evan Bailyn, See3’s Nasser Asif, and Sprout Social’s Justyn Howard.
  • K.I.T., Mean It: Follow us on Twitter or Facebook to stay tuned for updates and details.

Looking forward to seeing you there and our door is always open, so please contact us with any questions or suggestions.

Toward Solutions,

Darian Rodriguez Heyman

Darian Rodriguez Heyman is the Co-Producer & MC of Social Media for Nonprofits, and the Editor of Nonprofit Management 101. He’s the former E.D. of Craigslist Foundation and the creator of their Nonprofit Boot Camp. Darian is currently a nonprofit and environmental consultant, focusing on fundraising, board development, and messaging, and he is a frequent public speaker and keynote at conferences around the world.

Why community newspapers should blog (Guest post by Marcie Hill)

Guest post by Marcie Hill, Journalist/Professional Blogger for the community resource site Your Chicago South Side Resource & Founder/President of The Write Design Company

Many neighborhoods and communities have newspapers that provide information and resources that are relevant to them.  Because the journalists that write for these publications are from the community, residents tend to place a higher level of trust in these publications.  Unfortunately, many community newspapers have limited staffs and budgets and large amounts information to share.  To help remedy this situation, they should consider having a blog in addition to their print publication.  Following are seven reasons why.

  1. Create and control your own media. Most stories and events in individual communities are not covered by mainstream media. When they are covered, stories shown tend to be negative or missing great detail.  Blogging allows community papers to share positive information about the people, places and events in the community in any format they want.  Community members with writing skills may also contribute at some point. Ultimately, they control the media and the message.
  2. People who don’t live in those communities do not know what’s going on.  Reporting on blogs can dispel many untruths and exaggerations shared by mainstream media. This could also garner support from outsiders for issues relevant to the community.
  3. Blogs are another source of news distribution.  Many community newspapers that serve low-income residents tend to rely on print to get the message to this audience. They are missing out on a more tech savvy audience, which can ultimately expand the newspaper’s reach.
  4. Continue to build relationships with residents in the community. Blogs allow community newspaper to really listen to the issues and concerns of the people and have conversations with residents who stop by online. This will not only help build relationships, it will also give them more stories to report.
  5. Share information quickly.  Because many community newspapers tend to be weekly, bi-weekly or monthly, a blog will allow them to share new developments and last minute information as soon as it is received.
  6. Become a news source for mainstream media. In addition to press releases, newspapers can send links to relevant stories to large media outlets on their sites.  Their online presence and the number of visitors to their sites will greatly increase.
  7. Generate another source of revenue through advertising.  Community newspapers can get advertisements from local businesses or large organizations that would like to reach members of the communities they serve, which will result in more revenue.

Blogs can be valuable assets to community newspapers.  In addition to reporting accurate and positive information about the neighborhood, they can expand their readership beyond their community.  Their online presence will ultimately result in increased credibility as a news source by local residents and worldwide audiences.

Whether you’re a community group or a community newspaper, blogs can be a great, informal way to tell your story. If you’re interested in learning more about blogging, check out our upcoming basic blogging workshop with former Tribune Reporter Teresa Puente.

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